Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best valve for slurry flow control?

Typical 'line-of sight' valves used in slurry control applications are highly susceptible to erosion and cavitation, often resulting in frequent valve replacements and damaged pipes. SlurryFlo provides a unique solution to the downtime and labour costs associated with replacing conventional control valves.

READ MORE: SLURRY CONTROL VALVES

How long do SlurryFlo control valves last in service?

SlurryFlo control valves excel in any application where valve performance and life expectancy are critical. Variable orifice technology centers flow within the pipe, protecting the valve body and downstream piping. SlurryFlo delivers a quantum leap in service life, lasting 3-10 times longer than other severe service control valves.

READ MORE: SLURRYFLO SERVICE LIFE

What happens if your flow conditions change?

Variables such as revised flow conditions, changes to the process, new piping geometry and valve relocation can significantly affect valve behavior. These complexities can be difficult to overcome, however SlurryFlo's engineering team is prepared to implement a solution.

READ MORE: NEW FLOW CONDITIONS

What is valve cavitation?

An intriguing phenomenon can occur when fluid passes through a restriction; for example, when fluid flows through a control valve. The valve’s restricted flow path causes the fluid velocity to accelerate, which can result in the formation of vapor bubbles and cavitation. This may seem harmless; however it can result in significant noise, vibration, erosion and mechanical failure.

READ MORE: CAVITATION

When to select an open bonnet vs enclosed bonnet design?

SlurryFlo control valves can be supplied with either an enclosed bonnet, or an open bonnet design. The enclosed bonnet uses a simple gate stem packing arrangement, which delivers several benefits to the client. SlurryFlo’s open bonnet design however, eliminates the bonnet cavity which is often only used in unique flow conditions.

READ MORE: VALVE BONNET DESIGNS

Why are valve maintenance and spare parts important?

Industrial valve maintenance falls under two categories; planned and response maintenance. An effective planned (or preventative) maintenance program requires a schedule for inspecting and servicing the valve. Much less ideal is response (or emergency) maintenance, which is executed when a valve fails, or its performance has degraded to a point where it is detrimental to the process.

READ MORE: VALVE MAINTENANCE

Why do hard coatings (aka: welded overlays) look cracked?

Because they are! Welded overlays, such as those applied on SlurryFlo control valves (i.e. Tungsten Carbide, Chrome Carbide, Stellite, etc) are used by many industries to provide wear resistance for demanding applications. Due to the hardness of these overlays, it is common to see 'stress relief cracking.' The surface cracks occur during the cooling process (post welding), when internal stresses within the overlay are relieved.

READ MORE: HARD COATINGS

Do control valves have a preferred flow direction and piping layout?

Many control valves (and all SlurryFlo control valves) are uni-directional, meaning they are designed to operate in one flow direction only. Installing these valves incorrectly, or reversing the direction of flow during operation may cause premature wear and/or catastrophic valve failure, as well as damage to piping and ancillary equipment.

READ MORE: PROPER INSTALLATION

What benefit does a control valve with 'no shut-off' provide?

In the rare case that the selected control valve has insufficient Cv for the application, customers may opt for a trim design with significantly larger open area. This will provide an increase in flow capacity, however when fully ‘closed’, the valve will not provide ‘shut-off’ capability.

READ MORE: VALVE CAPACITY

What is a control valve seat leakage classification?

When the application requires a control valve to modulate clean fluid, there are many designs that will provide both tight shut-off and excellent control. However, when the media contains solids (i.e. a slurry), there is no perfect valve. These standard control valves will typically provide shut-off when brand new, however erosion from abrasive fluid often results in the valve leaking shortly after being in service.

READ MORE: VALVE LEAKAGE CLASS

What is control valve rangeability and turndown?

Rangeability refers to a control valve’s inherent characteristic; it is the ratio between the maximum and minimum controllable flows. Turndown Ratio refers to a valve’s installed characteristic; it is the ratio between the normal maximum system flow and the minimum controllable flow.

READ MORE: RANGEABILITY & TURNDOWN

What design codes and standards do valve manufacturers adhere to?

Most industrial valve companies manufacture their products to the specifications outlined in codes and standards for design, fabrication, testing and quality control such as the ASME B16.34.

READ MORE: CODES & STANDARDS
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